POSIX timer APIs are borked

I’m currently working on Dasynq, an event loop library in C++ (which is not yet in a state of being ready for use by external projects, though the functionality it currently exposes does work correctly as far as I know). It has come to the point where I want to add timer functionality, and this has been frustratingly tricky, mostly due to horribly designed APIs.

There are a few basic requirements to set out before I start:

  • There are essentially two types of timer – relative and absolute. I either want the timer to expire some given interval from now, or I want it to expire at some specific (“wall clock”) time. In the latter case, if the system time is changed the timeout should be suitably adjusted. (Example: if I set an alarm for 04:00, and the system change is changed by the user from 03:25 to 04:15, the alarm should expire immediately).
  • I want to be able to be sure that I can use a timer, at some point in the future. That is, I need to be able to allocate timers in advance (without necessarily arming them immediately) or at least to be able to re-set an existing timer to a specified timeout. I should be able to avoid the situation where I need a timer, which I knew I would need in advance, but am unable to create one due to resource limits / exhaustion.
  • I need a reasonable level of resolution. Timers should be usable for everything from running weekly tasks to animation timing.

With the above points in mind, let’s take a look at what POSIX provides.

POSIX timer APIs

First, the most basic timer-like call provided by POSIX is the alarm(…) function. It has second granularity, which rules it out immediately.

Then, there’s setitimer(…). This isn’t a particularly nice interface and delivers timer expiry via a signal. There is only one timer (well, there is one timer for each of several of different kinds of clock), which means that to allow for multiple timers to be managed we need to essentially multiplex the single timer; by itself this isn’t such a huge problem, but other limitations of the API make it fundamentally difficult, and the API is pretty broken to begin with in several ways.

The first problem with setitimer is that the interval timers deliver timeout events via signals, which is awkward, especially since setitimer itself is not async-signal-safe, meaning you can’t call it from within the signal handler to set the next desired timeout; if you want to multiplex multiple timeouts over the interval timer interface, you’re forced to turn asynchronous event notifications into synchronous events (which of course is what libraries like Dasynq are all about, so by itself this isn’t a huge problem).

The next problem with setitimer is that it only allows setting a relative timeout. If I want to get a timer notification at an absolute time, I need to get the current clock time (clock_gettime), calculate the time remaining until that time, and then set the timer. Not allowing an absolute timeout means that setting an alarm for a wall-clock time is pretty much impossible – since if the system time is changed by the user, the timer’s timeout interval won’t be adjusted. However, there’s a more subtle issue here: time might elapse between the calculation and setting the timer – the process could be preempted just after calculating the interval, and in unusual cases might not be scheduled again for a significant period of time. By the time it finally arms the timer, the interval is significantly incorrect. The only work to work around this (that I can think of, other than pretending that the problem doesn’t exist) is to check the clock time immediately after setting the interval, to make sure that it’s within a certain window of tolerance of the original measurement – and if not, to re-calculate the interval and reset the timer.

The safety check just described requires a minimum of two clock_gettime calls (which generally means two calls into the kernel) just for setting a timer. If multiple timers are being managed over the top of a single interval timer, that’s going to mean that two clock_gettime calls are required on each timer expiry.

Generalised POSIX timer interface

The real-time POSIX extensions also define timer_create, which appears to solve some of the problems above:

  • It allows the creation of multiple independent timers
  • It allows for specifying absolute (as well as relative) timeouts, and when using the realtime clock the timeout interval will be adjusted appropriately (for absolute timeouts) if the system time is altered

However, notification is still either via a signal, or via a thread (SIGEV_THREAD); the latter is problematic for implementations, because there is usually no way to detect notification failure if a thread cannot be created due to resource limits, and because it requires userspace support; on Linux you need to link with -lrt (and thus also pull in the pthreads library) to use timer_create etc, even if you don’t use SIGEV_THREAD. On OpenBSD the situation is worse – the realtime extensions are generally not supported, and create_timer et al are not available at all.

Even using timers with SIGEV_SIGNAL notifications is less than ideal. Using such timers in different threads requires cooperation between all threads, to either choose different signal numbers for notification or otherwise to have a common signal handler somehow suitably dispatch notifications to the correct thread.

Non-POSIX solutions

On Linux, timerfds (timerfd_create et al) provide an apparently sane solution to the whole messy problem – it supports multiple timers, supports absolute and relative timeouts, and delivers events by file handle notifications (can be used with select/poll/epoll etc). A large number of timers could be feasibly multiplexed over a single timerfd, which is good from a resource management perspective.

On OpenBSD (and various other BSDs) there is the option of using kqueue timers. This supports multiple timers, and neatly solves the problem of notification; however it only allows relative timeouts, and the timeout/interval cannot be changed, meaning that multiple timers cannot be multiplexed over a single kqueue timer. Even worse, it is not possible to pre-allocate timers; once created, they begin countdown immediately. This makes it impossible to discover resource allocation failure until the point that the timer is actually needed.

In Conclusion

The POSIX timer APIs are awkward and clunky. The setitimer functions support only limited use cases.  On the other hand, the generalised interface would be difficult to use in a library (since it either requires signal handling or multi-threading). On Linux, the timerfd interface is an ideal substitute. On other systems the general timer interface can be used, with some caveats and trade-offs, but it is not always available; on systems where it is not, and there is no system-specific replacement, the only option for wall-clock timers is to assume that the system clock does not change (other than by the usual tick) while the system is running.

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